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What Would Henry Do?

“What Would Henry Do?” sponsored by Thoreau Farm and The Thoreau Society with interviewer Ken Lizotte and guest speakers: Ronald Wesley Hoag, Anna West Winter, Ed Begley, Jr., and Sandra Harbert Petrulionis

“What Would Henry Do?” sponsored by Thoreau Farm and The Thoreau Society with interviewer Ken Lizotte and guest speakers: Ronald Wesley Hoag, Anna West Winter, Ed Begley, Jr., and Sandra Harbert Petrulionis

Based on Thoreau Farm’s book What Would Henry Do? Essays for the 21st Century, a panel of Thoreauvian essayists will share their reactions and responses to the title’s question. Webinar Books: https://bit.ly/3haEMfw

Watch the recording: https://us02web.zoom.us/rec/share/wcpQNrvA_V9OHafnzGvCRYURMbr5X6a8hHIc-6ZbzU7PSLCVJd2AALprCnEf2e_r

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.
Moderator Ken Lizotte, President, Thoreau Farm
Panelists will discuss their contributions to the book and lead a group discussion on potential actions Thoreau might take if he were with us today.

Ronald Wesley Hoag is emeritus professor of English at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina, “lame duck” president of the Thoreau Society, and a past editor of The Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies. A former Needham, Massachusetts, boy, Hoag fished in Walden Pond before he knew who Henry Thoreau was.

 

Anna West Winter is the executive director of the Concord-based non-profit organization Save Our Heritage. She serves on various boards including: The Walden Woods Project, Concord Museum, Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House, Emerson Hospital, and PBS Nova. She and her husband Neil live in Concord, where they raised their two children, and have founded MIT climate science labs and a MIT microbiome research center.

Ed Begley, Jr. is an actor and an environmentalist. Living Like Ed: A Guide to the Eco-Friendly Life – Ed Begley, Jr.

Sandra Harbert Petrulionis is Distinguished Professor of English and American Studies at Penn State University. She is the author of To Set This World Right: The Antislavery Movement in Thoreau’s Concord, the editor of Thoreau In His Own Time, and co-editor of other works on Thoreau and Transcendentalism. Although she read Walden in high school, no one introduced her to the militant Thoreau until graduate school, a deficiency she takes every opportunity to correct with her own students.

Date

Jun 13 2020
Expired!

Time

2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

More Info

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