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Re-visiting Thoreau and the Politics of Extinction – Final Annual Gathering Event

Annual Gathering Attendees have already been pre-registered for this event as part of basic registration. If you didn’t attend the conference, you can still register for this Zoom event, here.

Rochelle L. Johnson, Moderator

Linck Johnson, Charles A. Dana Professor of English at Colgate University, contributor to the Princeton University Press edition of The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, and author of Thoreau’s Complex Weave: The Writing of A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

 

• Robert Sattelmeyer, Emeritus Regents’ Professor at Georgia State University, contributor to the Princeton University Press edition of The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau, and author of Thoreau’s Reading: A Study in Intellectual History

 

Join these 2023 two recent recipients of the Thoreau Society Medal as they offer their own thoughts on this year’s Annual Gathering theme: Thoreau & the Politics of Extinction

blankThe Thoreau Society received a Mass Humanities Staffing Recovery Grant (2023-25) in support of our Membership and Program Coordinator. Funding from Mass Humanities has been provided through the Massachusetts Cultural Council.

Photo credit: USFW

Date

Sep 20 2023
Expired!

Time

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Cost

$15.00

Location

Zoom

Organizer

The Thoreau Society
Phone
(978) 369-5310
Email
info@thoreausociety.org
Website
https://thoreausociety.org
Zoom Registration

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341 Virginia Road, Concord, MA 01742
P: (978) 369-5310
F: (978) 369-5382
E:  info@thoreausociety.org

Educating people about the life, works, and legacy of Henry David Thoreau, challenging all to live a deliberate, considered life—since 1941.

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Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

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