Skip to content
  • News

Call for Papers: ALA Conference in Chicago

In conjunction with the Robert Frost Society, the Thoreau Society is pleased to sponsor these two sessions at the upcoming ALA Conference in Chicago, May 26-29, 2022. (https://americanliteratureassociation.org/).

Panel Session:

Rethinking the Wild: In “The Figure a Poem Makes,” Robert Frost argues, “If it is a wild tune, it is a poem.” In “Walking,” Henry Thoreau proclaims, “in wildness is the preservation of the world.” How is the wild manifested in the works of these two writers, and others, in their time and ours? What are the politics and poetics of the wild? How has the meaning and shape of the wild shifted as our own relationship to Nature has been transformed? Please submit 200 word proposals for 20-minute presentations by January 15th  to Mark Richardson (mark.richardson.kyoto@gmail.com) and John J. Kucich (jkucich@bridgew.edu).

Roundtable Session:

Thoreau and Frost and Others: This roundtable sessions invites unexpected pairings between these two canonical writers and other poets, writers and activists – or new insights into more familiar connections. Both scholarly and pedagogical approaches are welcome. Please submit 100 word proposals for 8 minute presentations by January 15th to Mark Richardson (mark.richardson.kyoto@gmail.com) and John J. Kucich (jkucich@bridgew.edu).

Get news from the Thoreau Society and learn about ways you can help preserve Thoreau Country as part of our common heritage and as the embodiment of Thoreau’s landmark contributions to social, political, and environmental thought.

The Thoreau Society®, Inc.
341 Virginia Road, Concord, MA 01742
P: (978) 369-5310
F: (978) 369-5382
E:  info@thoreausociety.org

Educating people about the life, works, and legacy of Henry David Thoreau, challenging all to live a deliberate, considered life—since 1941.

blank
blank
blank

Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Back To Top