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Thoreau Society Marjorie Harding Memorial Fellowship, 2018

Recipient will receive $1,000 for travel and Thoreau-related research in the Greater Boston area, plus free attendance (not required) at the 2018 Thoreau Society Annual Gathering in Concord.  Emerging and established scholars, as well as Thoreau enthusiasts, are eligible.  While candidates using the Walter Harding or other TS Collections at the Thoreau Institute Library (Lincoln) are preferred, those focused on other area resources are also encouraged to apply.  Project quality is essential.  (TS Collections are described here: https://thoreausociety.org/research.)  Awardee is invited to present results at an Annual Gathering (free attendance) during or after the fellowship work.  Applicants should email the following to Fellowship Committee Chair Ronald Hoag (hoagr@ecu.edu):

1.      Current curriculum vitae or resume

2.      Approx. 1,000-word proposal describing the project, explaining its significance, and specifying the relevance of area archives, collections, and resources to be visited.

3.      Graduate students only:  Optional letter of recommendation from a faculty member familiar with student’s work and proposed project (can be emailed separately to committee chair).

Applications due by Thursday, March 1, 2018.  Awardee will be notified by end of March and acknowledged in July at the TS Annual Gathering, Concord, Massachusetts.  Contact Fellowship Committee Chair with questions.

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